Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://une.intersearch.com.au/unejspui/handle/1959.11/12104
Title: Resprouting as a key functional trait: how buds, protection and resources drive persistence after fire
Contributor(s): Clarke, Peter J  (author); Lawes, MJ (author); Midgley, JJ (author); Lamont, BB (author); Ojeda, F (author); Burrows, GE (author); Enright, NJ (author); Knox, Kirsten J  (author)
Publication Date: 2013
Open Access: Yes
DOI: 10.1111/nph.12001Open Access Link
Handle Link: https://hdl.handle.net/1959.11/12104
Open Access Link: https://doi.org/10.1111/nph.12001Open Access Link
Abstract: Resprouting as a response to disturbance is now widely recognized as a key functional trait among woody plants and as the basis for the persistence niche. However, the underlying mechanisms that define resprouting responses to disturbance are poorly conceptualized. Resprouting ability is constrained by the interaction of the disturbance regime that depletes the buds and resources needed to fund resprouting, and the environment that drives growth and resource allocation. We develop a buds-protection-resources (BPR) framework for understanding resprouting in fire-prone ecosystems, based on bud bank location, bud protection, and how buds are resourced. Using this framework we go beyond earlier emphases on basal resprouting and highlight the importance of apical, epicormic and below-ground resprouting to the persistence niche. The BPR framework provides insights into: resprouting typologies that include both fire resisters (i.e. survive fire but do not resprout) and fire resprouters; the methods by which buds escape fire effects, such as thick bark; and the predictability of community assembly of resprouting types in relation to site productivity, disturbance regime and competition. Furthermore, predicting the consequences of global change is enhanced by the BPR framework because it potentially forecasts the retention or loss of above-ground biomass.
Publication Type: Journal Article
Source of Publication: New Phytologist, 197(1), p. 19-35
Publisher: Wiley-Blackwell Publishing Ltd
Place of Publication: Oxford, United Kingdom
ISSN: 1469-8137
Field of Research (FOR): 060208 Terrestrial Ecology
050202 Conservation and Biodiversity
060202 Community Ecology (excl Invasive Species Ecology)
Peer Reviewed: Yes
HERDC Category Description: C1 Refereed Article in a Scholarly Journal
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