Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://une.intersearch.com.au/unejspui/handle/1959.11/1248
Title: Assisted passage or passive drift: A comparison of alternative transport mechanisms for non-indigenous coastal species into the Southern Ocean
Contributor(s): Lewis, PN (author); Riddle, MJ (author); Smith, Stephen D (author)
Publication Date: 2005
Open Access: Yes
DOI: 10.1017/S0954102005002580
Handle Link: https://hdl.handle.net/1959.11/1248
Abstract: The introduction of invasive species may be the most profound modern threat to biological communities in high-latitude regions. In the Southern Ocean, the natural transport mechanism for shallow-water marine organisms provided by kelp rafts is being increasingly augmented by plastic debris and shipping activity. Plastic debris provide additional opportunities for dispersal of invasive organisms, but dispersal routes are passive, dependent on ocean currents, and already established. In contrast, ships create novel pathways, moving across currents and often visiting many locations over short periods of time. Transportation of hull-fouling communities by vessel traffic thus poses the most likely mechanism by which exotic species may be introduced to the Southern Ocean.
Publication Type: Journal Article
Source of Publication: Antarctic Science, 17(2), p. 183-191
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Place of Publication: United Kingdom
ISSN: 0954-1020
1365-2079
Field of Research (FOR): 060205 Marine and Estuarine Ecology (incl Marine Ichthyology)
Peer Reviewed: Yes
HERDC Category Description: C1 Refereed Article in a Scholarly Journal
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