Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://une.intersearch.com.au/unejspui/handle/1959.11/1385
Title: Environmental emission of mercury during gold mining by amalgamation process and its impact on soils of Gympie, Australia
Contributor(s): Dhindsa, Harkirat (author); Battle, Andrew (author); Prytz, S (author)
Publication Date: 2003
DOI: 10.1007/s00024-003-8770-y
Handle Link: https://hdl.handle.net/1959.11/1385
Abstract: The aims of this study were to estimate the total amount of mercury released to theenvironment during 60 years of gold mining (1867–1926) at Gympie, Queensland, Australia and to measurethe mercury levels in soil samples surrounding the mining activity. We estimated that 1902 tonnes of mercurywas released to the environment and about 1236 tonnes of which was released to the air. The mean mercury inthe soil samples in the vicinity of the Scottish battery varied from 1.07 to 99.26 µg g⁻¹ as compared to 0.075 µgg⁻¹ as background mercury concentrations. The maximum mercury concentration measured in sediments ofthe Langton Gully was 6.12 µg g⁻¹. These results show that large amount of mercury was used in this areaduring gold mining. Since mining is active in the area and Langton Gully flows into Mary River, we therefore,recommend that mercury concentration in air and fish should be monitored.
Publication Type: Journal Article
Source of Publication: Pure and Applied Geophysics, 160(0), p. 145-156
Publisher: Birkhauser Verlag
Place of Publication: Basel, Switzerland
ISSN: 0033-4553
Field of Research (FOR): 039901 Environmental Chemistry (incl Atmospheric Chemistry)
Peer Reviewed: Yes
HERDC Category Description: C1 Refereed Article in a Scholarly Journal
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