Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://une.intersearch.com.au/unejspui/handle/1959.11/1442
Title: Variation in the Thickness of A Fluid Interface Due to Internal Wave Propagation: A Lattice Boltzmann Simulation
Contributor(s): Buick, James (author); Hann, DB (author); Cosgrove, JA (author)
Publication Date: 2004
Handle Link: https://hdl.handle.net/1959.11/1442
Abstract: The change in the thickness of an interface between two immiscible fluids due to the propagation of an internal capillary-gravity wave along the interface is considered using a BGK (Bhatnagar, Gross and Krook) lattice Boltzmann model of a binary fluid. The vertical thickness of the interface is recorded from the simulations since this is the most easily measured quantity in any simulation or experiment. The vertical thickness is then related to the actual thickness (perpendicular to the interface) which is seen to vary with the phase of the wave. The positions of the maxima and minima thicknesses are seen to be approximately constant relative to the phase of the propagating wave and the range of variation of the thickness decreases at approximately the same rate as the wave amplitude is damped. A simplified model for the interface is considered which predicts a similar variation due to the interface being stretched as the internal wave propagates.
Publication Type: Journal Article
Source of Publication: American Journal of Applied Sciences, 1(1), p. 5-11
Publisher: Science Publications
Place of Publication: New York, United States
ISSN: 1554-3641
1546-9239
Field of Research (FOR): 020303 Fluid Physics
Peer Reviewed: Yes
HERDC Category Description: C1 Refereed Article in a Scholarly Journal
Other Links: http://www.scipub.org/fulltext/ajas/ajas115-11.pdf
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