Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://une.intersearch.com.au/unejspui/handle/1959.11/1452
Full metadata record
DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorHaworth, Robert Johnen
dc.date.accessioned2009-05-04T15:17:00Z
dc.date.issued2003en
dc.identifier.citationQuaternary International, 103(1), p. 41-55en
dc.identifier.issn1040-6182en
dc.identifier.issn1873-4553en
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1959.11/1452en
dc.description.abstractSydney's surface geology of Hawkesbury Sandstone capped with Wianamatta Shale has produced poor soils but good building material. The topography, derived from the subaerial erosion and extensive dissection of the Permian/Triassic sedimentary strata of the Sydney Basin, has been the strongest constraint on the city's growth. Steep-sided valleys carved out of sandstone plateaux forced the direction of settlement along the flatter interfluves, and in recent decades out onto the tectonic depression of the Cumberland Plain to the west. Holocene marine transgression flooded the eastern incisions of the eroded mass, producing some of the few safe anchorages on the southeast Australian coast, as well as bedrock-controlled zeta-curved coastal beaches. Some of the geological disadvantages have turned into advantages over time. The sterility of the skeletal sandstone soils made farming difficult, but has allowed much of the native vegetation to be retained for conservation and recreation. Coastal quartz sand deposits produced equally infertile soils but provided pure sand fill for Sydney's many attractive beaches, along with industrial uses. The depth of underlying coal deposits discouraged early mining within the city boundaries, to the ultimate benefit of residential development, while tectonic stability reduced complications for infrastructure engineering works.en
dc.languageenen
dc.publisherPergamonen
dc.relation.ispartofQuaternary Internationalen
dc.titleThe shaping of Sydney by its urban geologyen
dc.typeJournal Articleen
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/S1040-6182(02)00140-4en
dc.subject.keywordsGeologyen
local.contributor.firstnameRobert Johnen
local.subject.for2008040399 Geology not elsewhere classifieden
local.subject.seo750803 Urban planningen
local.profile.schoolSchool of Behavioural, Cognitive and Social Sciencesen
local.profile.emailrhaworth@une.edu.auen
local.output.categoryC1en
local.record.placeauen
local.record.institutionUniversity of New Englanden
local.identifier.epublicationsrecordpes:1268en
local.publisher.placeOxford, United Kingdomen
local.format.startpage41en
local.format.endpage55en
local.peerreviewedYesen
local.identifier.volume103en
local.identifier.issue1en
local.contributor.lastnameHaworthen
dc.identifier.staffune-id:rhawort3en
local.profile.roleauthoren
local.identifier.unepublicationidune:1485en
dc.identifier.academiclevelAcademicen
local.title.maintitleThe shaping of Sydney by its urban geologyen
local.output.categorydescriptionC1 Refereed Article in a Scholarly Journalen
local.description.statisticsepubsVisitors: 154<br />Views: 156<br />Downloads: 0en
Appears in Collections:Journal Article
Files in This Item:
3 files
File Description SizeFormat 
Show simple item record

SCOPUSTM   
Citations

16
checked on Nov 26, 2018

Page view(s)

40
checked on Mar 2, 2019
Google Media

Google ScholarTM

Check

Altmetric


Items in Research UNE are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.