Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://une.intersearch.com.au/unejspui/handle/1959.11/1686
Title: From Loaded Dog to Dead Dog: The Dog as Myth and Mate in Australian Story
Contributor(s): Haworth, Robert John (author)
Publication Date: 2003
Handle Link: https://hdl.handle.net/1959.11/1686
Abstract: The dog, in the form of the dingo, entered Australia around 3500 years ago. As the first exotic domesticate to reach mainland Australia, we can reconstruct in broad outline the effect on local ecology. This included the extinction of the two largest marsupial carnivores, and probably much more as changes worked their way through natural systems. We can only guess at the effect the dingo had on Aboriginal society and folkways, but it must have been quite an impact. Dingoes began to appear in rock art. The dingo was absorbed into Aboriginal skin group nomenclature, and there are records of individual dogs buried with all the elaboration given to human interments.
Publication Type: Journal Article
Source of Publication: Australian Folklore, v.18, p. 207-216
Publisher: Australian Folklore Association
Place of Publication: University of New England, Australia
ISSN: 1033-2510
0819-0852
Field of Research (FOR): 210399 Historical Studies not elsewhere classified
Peer Reviewed: Yes
HERDC Category Description: C1 Refereed Article in a Scholarly Journal
Other Links: http://www.une.edu.au/folklorejournal
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Appears in Collections:Journal Article

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