Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://une.intersearch.com.au/unejspui/handle/1959.11/1771
Title: Beyond the Nation State: Corporate Governance in Transition
Contributor(s): Clarke, Andrew David (author)
Publication Date: 2005
Handle Link: https://hdl.handle.net/1959.11/1771
Abstract: This article re-examines the concept of nationally based corporate governance systems in the wake of effects rendered beyond the nation state and beyond narrow legal parameters. These effects include postmodernism, the global change management movement and theories of globalization as they affect the traditional hegemony of state actors. As a result of these forces, there is, arguably, an emerging theory of convergence of national systems of corporate governance. Is such convergence inevitable or, in fact, an overstated and under-examined assumption, because states are proving more resistant in their bid to retain their particularized models of corporate governance?Part One considers contemporary and emerging views of corporate governance. Is the concept of corporate governance a settled one, and what does it involve?Part Two considers three of the key drivers of ‘beyond the nation state’ influence. These include postmodernism which can be viewed as a social or political construct of wide importance or a narrow conceit that has already passed its zenith of influence. Secondly, is the concept of change management, a theory emanating from business and psychology platforms which throws down a fundamental challenge to the veracity of national legal systems. And third, the phenomenon of globalization, which like corporate governance itself, proves a slippery and malleable concept, whose influence is to difficult to locate and agree upon.Part Three examines the case for and against a theory of convergence of national systems That is, is it inevitable in light of the extra-national forces referred to in Part Two, that national systems will converge? Is there in effect one system only, so that convergence is both a natural and inevitable progression as the 21st century unfolds?Part Four concludes by stating the arguments for and against convergence and by pointing to the emerging trends in terms of the interplay between state and extra-state dimensions.
Publication Type: Journal Article
Source of Publication: Macquarie Journal of Business Law, v.2, p. 231-247
Publisher: Division of Law, Macquarie University
Place of Publication: Sydney
ISSN: 1449-0269
Field of Research (FOR): 180109 Corporations and Associations Law
Peer Reviewed: Yes
HERDC Category Description: C1 Refereed Article in a Scholarly Journal
Other Links: http://www.law.mq.edu.au/html/MqJBL/vol2/vol2_10.pdf
Statistics to Oct 2018: Visitors: 163
Views: 162
Downloads: 0
Appears in Collections:Journal Article

Files in This Item:
3 files
File Description SizeFormat 
Show full item record

Page view(s)

54
checked on Mar 4, 2019
Google Media

Google ScholarTM

Check

SCOPUSTM   
Citations

 

Items in Research UNE are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.