Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://une.intersearch.com.au/unejspui/handle/1959.11/2973
Title: What kinds of jobs help carers combine care and employment?
Contributor(s): Hill, Trish (author); Thomson, Cathy (author); Bittman, Michael (author); Griffiths, Megan (author)
Publication Date: 2008
Handle Link: https://hdl.handle.net/1959.11/2973
Abstract: In an era in which policies aim to increase labour force participation in the context of an ageing population, an important question is how many employees will experience the competing demands of paid work and informal care responsibilities? Until recently, the only way of answering this question in Australia was to ask how many people were informal carers and employed at a single point in time, using cross-sectional data. According to the 2003 Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS) Survey of Disability, Ageing and Carers (SDAC), at a single point in time, about 13% of employees combine informal caring and employment (Thomson, Hill, Griffiths, & Bittman, in press). However, using the narrower category of 'primary' carer - that is, the person who provides the 'most' informal assistance to a care recipient, as distinct from 'any' informal assistance - the answer is a much lower figure of 2%. The proportion of primary carers in this situation is important, because being a primary carer is one of the requirements that gives informal carers a claim on some state support for their caring. In other words, the primary caring role makes them eligible for Carer Payment (a tightly targeted pension) or Carer Allowance (financial assistance). Many of these carers are also employed; a study of Gray, Edwards, and Zmijewski (2008) found that almost a quarter of Carer Payment recipients and half Carer Allowance recipients in their sample were employed.
Publication Type: Journal Article
Source of Publication: Family Matters, p. 27-31
Publisher: Australian Institute of Family Studies
Place of Publication: Australia
ISSN: 1030-2646
Field of Research (FOR): 160899 Sociology not elsewhere classified
Peer Reviewed: Yes
HERDC Category Description: C1 Refereed Article in a Scholarly Journal
Other Links: http://search.informit.com.au/documentSummary;dn=482084586386439;res=IELHSS
Statistics to Oct 2018: Visitors: 166
Views: 170
Downloads: 0
Appears in Collections:Journal Article

Files in This Item:
2 files
File Description SizeFormat 
Show full item record

Page view(s)

36
checked on Jan 12, 2019
Google Media

Google ScholarTM

Check

SCOPUSTM   
Citations

 

Items in Research UNE are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.