Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://une.intersearch.com.au/unejspui/handle/1959.11/435
Title: Chronic Presenteeism: The Multiple Dimensions to Men's Absence from Part-Time Work
Contributor(s): Sheridan, AJ (author)orcid 
Publication Date: 2004
Open Access: Yes
DOI: 10.1111/j.1468-0432.2004.00229.x
Handle Link: https://hdl.handle.net/1959.11/435
Abstract: While there is considerable debate in the popular press about the changing roles of men and women, labour force statistics suggest that there has been little change in the work patterns of men and women. Despite the increasing availability of part-time work, men in professional and managerial roles are not considering part-time as an option for them. Rather, there are increasing organizational pressures for men to be working long hours in the paid workforce. In this paper, men's absence from part-time work is considered from a multidisciplinary perspective. Factors operating at the individual, social and organizational levels are identified and explored in terms of their impact on men's working patterns. A model is presented that characterizes men's absence from part-time work as a result of the mutually reinforcing nature of these factors.
Publication Type: Journal Article
Source of Publication: Gender, Work & Organization, 11(2), p. 207-225
Publisher: Blackwell Publishing Ltd
Place of Publication: Oxford, UK
ISSN: 0968-6673
Field of Research (FOR): 150305 Human Resources Management
Peer Reviewed: Yes
HERDC Category Description: C1 Refereed Article in a Scholarly Journal
Statistics to Oct 2018: Visitors: 177
Views: 147
Downloads: 33
Appears in Collections:Journal Article
UNE Business School

Files in This Item:
6 files
File Description SizeFormat 
open/SOURCE01.pdfAuthor final version191.82 kBAdobe PDF
Download Adobe
View/Open
Show full item record

SCOPUSTM   
Citations

54
checked on Nov 26, 2018

Page view(s)

94
checked on Feb 8, 2019

Download(s)

16
checked on Feb 8, 2019
Google Media

Google ScholarTM

Check

Altmetric

SCOPUSTM   
Citations

 

Items in Research UNE are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.