Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://une.intersearch.com.au/unejspui/handle/1959.11/593
Title: Gender and Coping: the parents of children with high functioning autism
Contributor(s): Gray, DE (author)
Publication Date: 2003
Open Access: Yes
DOI: 10.1016/S0277-9536(02)00059-X
Handle Link: https://hdl.handle.net/1959.11/593
Abstract: Gender is a concept that is frequently discussed in the literature on stress, coping and illness. Research has reported that women are more vulnerable than men are to stressful events and use different strategies to cope with them. Furthermore, it is often asserted that these gender-based differences in coping may partially explain the differential impact of stressful events on men and women. Unfortunately, much of this research has equated gender with sex and failed to contextualise the experience of illness and coping. This paper presents a qualitative analysis of the role of gender and coping among parents of children with high functioning autism or Asperger's syndrome in an Australian sample. It attempts to analyse the different meanings of the disability for mothers and fathers and describes the various strategies that parents use to cope with their child's disability.
Publication Type: Journal Article
Source of Publication: Social Science & Medicine, 56(3), p. 631-642
Publisher: Elsevier Science B.V.
Place of Publication: Amsterdam
ISSN: 0277-9536
Field of Research (FOR): 160899 Sociology not elsewhere classified
Peer Reviewed: Yes
HERDC Category Description: C1 Refereed Article in a Scholarly Journal
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Appears in Collections:Journal Article

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